Texas Insurance Commissioner still mulling bond anticipation notes

Texas Insurance Commissioner Julia Rathgeber has not reached a decision yet on whether to accede to the request of the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association and others that she overturn the refusal of her predecessor Eleanor Kitzman to borrow about $500 million to help pay any claims that the financially troubled insurer might have  this summer. A response by TWIA to a public information request states that “TWIA is working with the Texas Department of Insurance and the Texas Public Finance Authority to explore all funding options, including the BAN [bond anticipation notes].” According to TWIA, it has not heard anything further from lenders about whether they are still willing, in light of rising market interest rates, to enter into a BAN deal on the same terms as they apparently were this spring. The failure to obtain a reversal likely means, as TWIA Board Member Alice Gannon candidly acknowledged at a June board meeting, that TWIA would not be able to pay many claims in timely fashion should a significant storm occur during the remainder of the 2013 hurricane season.

Although Commissioner Rathgeber has not made a decision yet, in some sense the absence of a decision comes close to an upholding of her predecessor’s determination. One of the touted advantages of the BAN had been that it would have permitted TWIA to purchase reinsurance that attached at $2.2 billion of losses and provided an extra $250 million worth of reinsurance. Right now, the attachment point on its $1 billion of reinsurance stands at $1.7 billion, creating what TWIA hopes (unrealistically perhaps) is a $2.7 billion stack of protection. But the election to go to the higher level attachment point appears to have expired on July 15.  So, unless a new deal with the reinsurers can be struck, that advantage of pre-event borrowing seems to have disappeared. Moreover, it is not clear that a bond anticipation note can be obtained on the same terms as were available in the spring when interest rates were lower. Renegotiating the terms of a BAN will take some time even if Rathgeber ultimately overturns the decision in whole or in part.  (I say in part because some of the arguments against a BAN have less force if the amount borrowed were, say $100-$200 million rather than $500 million). Each day that goes by with the Kitzman decision in force is a day deeper into the heart of hurricane season in which TWIA is particularly vulnerable.

One possible reason for the Rathgeber delay is the relationship between the BAN and the desire of many to shrink TWIA. Many believe that TWIA’s problems would be more manageable if it’s maximum exposure were reduced to the levels that existed before Hurricane Ike or even earlier. They believe TWIA’s problems become progressively more intractable as ever more people develop the Texas coast based on an assumption of continued subsidized rates.  If TWIA borrows money that requires it to repay various fixed sums, it is going to depend on its premium base not shrinking much.  Indeed, if I were a lender I might want various covenants protecting me from a depopulation of TWIA. I would at least price that risk into the interest rate charged. Borrowing money via a bond anticipation note therefore makes it more difficult for any special session of the legislature to develop a plan substantially to reform TWIA.  Thus, although the prospects of such a special session on windstorm insurance reform seem rather dim at present, Governor Perry has not taken it entirely off the table. Commissioner Rathgeber, who likely has her pulse on the mood of the legislature and the governor, may well be balancing the timing of any decision with beliefs on the prospects for reform.

Great news or the calm before the storm?

Great news or the calm before the storm?

Of course, the one good piece of news is that the Gulf of Mexico has, contrary to most predictions, been quiet so far this summer. As a result, TWIA’s financial situation has not been tested. Indeed, it should be running a solid profit for the past few months. Unfortunately, someone might have made the same observation about the first half of the tornado season in the midwest this spring.  Remember all those articles expressing puzzlement about where all the tornados were?  You can find some here, here and here. As residents of Granbury, Texas, Moore, Oklahoma, El Reno, Oklahoma and others can attest, however, predictions about long run climactic events can not be based on a few months of experience. Whether or not TWIA gets to borrow $500 million or some lesser some based on a decision later this summer by Commissioner Rathgeber, the state and TWIA’s policyholders need to hope that Hurricanes 2013 is not like Tornados 2013 in which all was quiet for the first half of the season, only to see historically devastating outbreaks during the second half.

One thought on “Texas Insurance Commissioner still mulling bond anticipation notes

  1. A couple of tropical waves from Africa near Cape Verde Island have resulted in two modest tropical cyclones both which weaken and didn’t get to the Gulf. The hurricane season for 2013 is not yet firing up. With the lack of reform from the legislature, TWIA has to get lucky at least to 9/1/2015. Don’t go to Vegas on those odds!

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